FOTOWEEK 2017: ABSTRATION/REPRESENTATION

The evocative and thought-provoking works of nine D.C.-based photographers will be on display at Studio Gallery in conjunction with FotoWeek DC 2017. The exhibit features pictures that exemplify each photographer’s approach to the theme of Abstraction/Representation. Artist statements from Iwan Bagus, Andy Bloxham, Soomin Ham, Leena Jayaswal, Jo Levine, Steven Marks, Rania Razek, Shaun Schroth, and Alexandra Silverthorne will explore the ideas, challenges, and visions that inspired them. 

Review by Mark Jenkins of the Washington Post:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/in-the-galleries-a-surrealist-painter-inspires-a-photographer/2017/11/02/35793f1c-bd8b-11e7-959c-fe2b598d8c00_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.422facd5b308

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I'M PRINT 1 & 2

My prints cover the world; imprinted and etched by hands that are not my own. How many hands went into making these two images displayed before you? That number can be a gross oversimplification or a number far from fathomable. 

Two hands and two feet made this work come into being, but the reality is that there were far more hands and feet at play.

As artists, we most typically find ourselves in the roll of a creator, gathering materials, measuring, planning, testing, and executing our creative ideas and visions. But as creators, we often fail to recognize the impact or complicated relationship between creation and consumption. 

A simple list of materials for these pieces would look something like this: gum bichromate/ carbon print on paper, framed.

A slightly more detailed version, like this: gum arabic, potassium dichromate, potassium metabisorbate, carbon/charcoal, hot-pressed watercolor paper, wood, styrene, aluminum, and plastic. 

Yet in reality the list of materials is much more extensive: gum arabic, potassium dichromate, potassium metabisorbate, distilled water, carbon/charcoal, plastic packaging, sticker label, printing press ink, plastic bubble packaging, cardboard shipping container, tape, inkjet printer ink, wood pulp, tap water, wood, printed paper insert, styrene, protective plastic wrap, aluminum, plastic, shrink wrap, printed sticker. 

Even this list fails to take fully into account the myriad of materials used and consumed in the sourcing, manufacturing, and distribution of the basic materials or the amount of energy consumed in such endeavors. Even the most devoted pursuit would likely overlook some piece in the chain of events that led to my ability to create this piece.

My hands didn’t mine the ore that built the machines that transported the minerals to the refinery that shipped them off to a laboratory for processing and packaging which was delivered to a store for my utilization for your consumption. 

There is no thing on this planet that I have not indirectly touched.